Be energised as a Coach – join the Premier Sports College study team

  • International Diploma in Strength and Conditioning Course

This course is accredited by one of the UK’s leading Awarding Bodies – the NCFE (UK) – and has been granted the NCFE Investing In Quality Licence. NCFE is recognised as an Awarding Organisation by the qualification regulators in the UK.  Find out more

  • Child or Juvenile Athlete-Player  Development Course

Calling all Coaches of Juvenile Athletes, Players and Teams – The best range of informative courses to become an expert at coaching children. Find out more

  • Premier College Video Series (Lectures and Practical Workshops)

This section of our website carries a range of interesting videos for coaches, managers, PE teachers, athletes and players

  • International Diploma in Functional Movement, Analysis and Development

Find out more

FOR BEST VALUE!   Note: Select your location please – Top Right Corner of this home page. Payment is best in one’s own currency and for payment in Euro go .ie in Dollars .com and for Sterling payments .co.uk

Premier Sports College

The Premier Sports College is a specific education provider dedicated to coach education and athlete-player development and performance enhancement. The purpose of the college is to make a positive difference in the lives of sports coaches, managers, trainers, fitness industry professionals as well as to school teachers and to offer modern state-of-the art content in all our courses.

Read More Free Course

Be energised as a Coach – join the Premier Sports College study team

  • International Diploma in Strength and Conditioning Course

This course is accredited by one of the UK’s leading Awarding Bodies – the NCFE (UK) – and has been granted the NCFE Investing In Quality Licence. NCFE is recognised as an Awarding Organisation by the qualification regulators in the UK.  Find out more

  • Child or Juvenile Athlete-Player  Development Course

Calling all Coaches of Juvenile Athletes, Players and Teams – The best range of informative courses to become an expert at coaching children. Find out more

  • Premier College Video Series (Lectures and Practical Workshops)

This section of our website carries a range of interesting videos for coaches, managers, PE teachers, athletes and players

  • International Diploma in Functional Movement, Analysis and Development

Find out more

FOR BEST VALUE!   Note: Select your location please – Top Right Corner of this home page. Payment is best in one’s own currency and for payment in Euro go .ie in Dollars .com and for Sterling payments .co.uk

SHORT COURSES (Under€50)

40 Sample Stamina Training Sessions

50 Sample Speed Training Sessions

Organisation and Ordering of the Training Session

Fundamental Motor Skills For 6 to 12 Year Olds 

Functional Skills for 6 to 12 Year Olds

The Principles of Speed Training

Speed Training for 6 to 9 Year Olds

Speed Training for 10 to 12 Year Olds

Theory and Practice of the Warm-up

Understanding the Importance of Rest and Recovery

Coaching Hint of the Week

According to Wikipedia (the free online dictionary) a warm-up is usually performed before participating in technical sports or exercising. Warming up is a process by which the human machine is brought to a condition at which it safely responds to the nerve impulses of the person for a quick and efficient action.

The aim of a warm-up should include the ability to conserve energy. This is lost on many coaches and managers. In fact most warm-up routines are far too long. Some teams spend up to 30 or 40 minutes warming-up which is a waste of energy and may even dull the nervous system.

According to Behm “once one’s body temperature goes up, then you’ve got an increase in neural conduction velocity – the speed at which you’re transmitting impulses down your nerves.”

An interesting study by Young and Elliott (2001) demonstrated that warm-ups that included static stretching as part of the physical exercise could detrimentally affect subsequent strength and explosive activities – speed and power activities such as sprinting, jumping, catching and kicking/striking.

However one important feature of a warm-up is the length of the warm-up – generally it is accepted that short warm-up of 10-15 minutes are more valuable than those which take 20-40 minutes as long as the intensity is built up over the duration of the warm-up and that sport specific activities are included at game-speed towards the end.

 

References:

  1. Behm, D, G.; Chaouachi, A. (2011).3. Behm, D, G.; Chaouachi, A. (2011). A review of the acute effects of static and dynamic stretching on performance. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 111, 2633-2651. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 111, 2633-2651.
  2. Young, W. & Elliott, S. (2001). Acute effects of static stretching, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching, and maximum voluntary contractions on explosive force production and jumping performance. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 72, 273-279.
Hint of the Week

Quote of the Week

Coming together is a beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success   Henry Ford on Teamwork
Quote of the Week